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Brent Bommentre bids the Finnstep adieu

Vancouver atwitter over 2010 Olympics

Brent Bommentre and ice dance partner Kimberly Navarro performed the Finnstep for the first and last time in Vancouver.
Brent Bommentre and ice dance partner Kimberly Navarro performed the Finnstep for the first and last time in Vancouver. (Getty Images)

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By Brent Bommentre, special to icenetwork.com
(02/04/2009) - Brent Bommentre takes us behind-the-scenes at the 2009 Four Continents Championships in Vancouver, British Columbia. In this edition, Bommentre laments the demise of the Finnstep while musing over Super Bowl ads.

Wednesday, Feb. 4

Of all the emotions of competition (nerves, excitement, joy and disappointment), the primary one was relief.

Sure, some of us probably wanted to skate better. But, we all finished in a collective sigh and quick change of focus to the OD. It feels weird to retire a dance that we barely had a week to learn and train. So, here is my best shot:

Today, we lost a good friend, a friend we hardly got a chance to get to know. He was fun, quick and sure had a lot of steps. Behind the dance community's tears, I know there was a glimmer of hope that the newest member of our family will be in a better place. Sure, we can visit him any time we like on icenetwork.com, but today was a rare event for dance. We hang on to our traditions pretty tightly, and never has a dance (for us) made a debut and an exit the same day.

Finnstep -- we will miss you.

On another note, it is very exciting to be in Vancouver. Not only do Canadians take skating, even compulsories, very seriously; but they LOVE the Olympics and all other sports. A great example is the Super Bowl. After arriving Sunday, we were pretty stoked to watch the game and the commercials. The game was amazing; I called the finish (offensive play would win the game), but I had the wrong team.

However, the commercials totally took me by surprise. They were totally different in Canada. No Doritos. No Transformers 2 trailer (I am still crying about that)... everything here is about the rings -- and not the one Big Ben got.

There are signs everywhere that the city is collectively preparing to welcome the world -- everything from construction cranes to billboards. There is energy in the air. Just like the Olympics themselves, I feel like the city knows the true meaning of the Games is in the process of self-improvement, and not the event itself.

Signing off,
Brent "Billy Shakes" Bommentre